Are You There, God? It's Me, Margaret

Are You There, God? It's Me, Margaret

Paperback

By (author) Judy Blume

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  • Publisher: MACMILLAN CHILDREN'S BOOKS
  • Format: Paperback | 192 pages
  • Dimensions: 130mm x 196mm x 14mm | 180g
  • Publication date: 1 April 2000
  • Publication City/Country: London
  • ISBN 10: 0330398083
  • ISBN 13: 9780330398084
  • Edition: Unabridged
  • Edition statement: Unabridged
  • Sales rank: 10,730

Product description

Not suitable for children under 9 years of age Life isn't easy for Margaret. She's moved away from her childhood home, she's starting a new school, finding new friends - and she's convinced she's not normal. For a start she hasn't got a clue whether she wants to be Jewish like her father or Christian like her mother. Everyone else seems really sure of who they are. And, worst of all, she's a 'late developer'. She just knows that all her friends are going to need a bra before she does. It's too embarrassing to talk to her parents about these things. So she talks to God instead - and waits for an answer ...Judy Blume has written some of the best books of our time about real-life issues - family stress and pressures, what happens when your parents divorce, the problems of growing up and sexual awakening, bereavement - with insight, sensitivity and honesty. The response of readers all around the world continues to make her one of the best-loved writers ever published.

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Author information

For several decades, Judy Blume has been winning legions of fans around the world with her stories. More than 75 million copies of her books have been sold, and her work has been translated into twenty-eight languages. She receives thousands of letters every month from readers of all ages who share their feelings and concerns with her. Judy lives on islands up and down the east coast of America with her husband.

Review quote

Do you know what I liked most about it though? Its boldness. To tackle the situations in this book at the time it was written surely must have raised a lot of eyebrows and a lot of debates. Pushing boundaries in fiction is something I search for, and I found it in this book of our childhood secrets. It's a book for us girls whatever age we may be to read and connect with everything that's going on in it. thebookgeekwearspajamas.co.uk Funny and thought provoking. booksteensandmagazines.com A great book and trip down memory lane. jilllovestoread.blogspot.co.uk This book is still as wonderful and magical as it was when I was 12! NetGally Reviewer

Editorial reviews

The comical longings of little girls who want to be big girls - exercising to the chant of "We must - we must - increase our bust!" - and the wistful longing of Margaret, who talks comfortably to God, for a religion, come together as her anxiety to be normal, which is natural enough in sixth grade. And if that's what we want to tell kids, this is a fresh, unclinical case in point: Mrs. Blume (Iggie's House, 1969) has an easy way with words and some choice ones when the occasion arises. But there's danger in the preoccupation with the physical signs of puberty - with growing into a Playboy centerfold, the goal here, though the one girl in the class who's on her way rues it; and with menstruating sooner rather than later - calming Margaret, her mother says she was a late one, but the happy ending is the first drop of blood: the effect is to confirm common anxieties instead of allaying them. (And countertrends notwithstanding, much is made of that first bra, that first dab of lipstick.) More promising is Margaret's pursuit of religion: to decide for herself (earlier than her 'liberal' parents intended), she goes to temple with a grandmother, to church with a friend; but neither makes any sense to her - "Twelve is very late to learn." Fortunately, after a disillusioning sectarian dispute, she resumes talking to God. . . to thank him for that telltale sign of womanhood. Which raises the last question: of a satirical stance in lieu of a perspective. (Kirkus Reviews)

Product safety notice

Not suitable for children under 9 years of age