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    Arcadia (Paperback) By (author) Jim Crace

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    DescriptionA novel on the theme of city life set in the present day and looking back over 80 years. Crace's earlier novels have won "The Guardian" Fiction Prize, the David Higham Prize, the Whitbread First Novel and the Chianti Ruffino prize in Italy.


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  • Full bibliographic data for Arcadia

    Title
    Arcadia
    Authors and contributors
    By (author) Jim Crace
    Physical properties
    Format: Paperback
    Number of pages: 352
    Width: 130 mm
    Height: 197 mm
    Thickness: 18 mm
    Weight: 235 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9780330325233
    ISBN 10: 033032523X
    Classifications

    BIC E4L: GEN
    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: F1.1
    DC20: 823.914
    BIC subject category V2: FA
    Libri: B-232
    Warengruppen-Systematik des deutschen Buchhandels: 11000
    BISAC V2.8: FIC000000
    Thema V1.0: FBA
    Edition
    New edition
    Edition statement
    New edition
    Publisher
    Pan MacMillan
    Imprint name
    PICADOR
    Publication date
    12 March 1993
    Publication City/Country
    London
    Review text
    The British Crace maintains his reputation as a bold fabulist with this third novel (Continent; The Gift of Stones) about urban man nourished by fictions of his rural past. Victor, the Vegetable King, began by peddling eggs in the marketplace at age seven; now, a millionaire octogenarian, he decides to replace the open-air market with a glass-enclosed extravaganza. That's the gist of what happens here; Crace passes up conventional storylines (a rags-to-riches saga, corporate intrigue) to attend to his own altogether convincing world, recognizably contemporary but geographically indeterminate - a city rooted in a medieval English past but dependent on American-style freeways, its two poles Big Vic (the fortress-like skyscraper where frail, laconic Victor lives alone) and the Soap Market, where the soapies (fruit and vegetable traders) form a link between town and country and dispense "the blessing of the multitude" as lustily as the denizens of Gershwin's Catfish Row. And where, too, Victor's mother, Em, a new arrival from the country, once begged for money, Victor a fixture at her breast, Em transforming her harsh rural past into a "tinseled paradise," passing on this fantasy to Victor, who will eventually pass it on to the entire city as Arcadia, his exotic new marketplace. Crace skips over the 70-odd years between Victor's debut as a boy-trader and his present eminence, dwelling instead on the struggle between Victor and his top aide, Rook, fired for taking kickbacks from the soapies; but the struggle, and Rook's grisly end, are in turn secondary to the coming of Arcadia - the novel's climax - and Crace's opportunity for a somewhat trite attack on shopping malls. Read this for its story, and you'll feel shortchanged; read it for its rich texture, with influences running the gamut from Robert Browning to speculative fiction, and you'll feel amply rewarded. (Kirkus Reviews)