Ancient Middle Niger: Urbanism and the Self-organizing Landscape

Ancient Middle Niger: Urbanism and the Self-organizing Landscape

Paperback Case Studies in Early Societies

By (author) Roderick J. McIntosh

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  • Publisher: CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY PRESS
  • Format: Paperback | 278 pages
  • Dimensions: 152mm x 228mm x 18mm | 450g
  • Publication date: 7 November 2005
  • Publication City/Country: Cambridge
  • ISBN 10: 0521012430
  • ISBN 13: 9780521012430
  • Illustrations note: 44 b/w illus. 17 maps 2 tables
  • Sales rank: 1,124,912

Product description

The cities of West Africa's Middle Niger, only recently brought to the world's attention, make us rethink the 'whys' and the 'wheres' of ancient urbanism. The cities of the Middle Niger present the archaeologist with something of a novelty; a non-nucleated, clustered city-plan with no centralized, state-focused power. Ancient Middle Niger explores the emergence of these cities in the first millennium B.C. and the evolution of their hinterlands from the perspective of the self-organized landscape. Cities appeared in a series of profound transforms to the human-land relations and this book illustrates how each transform was a leap in complexity. The book ends with an examination of certain critical moments in the emergence of other urban landscapes in Mesopotamia, along the Nile, and in northern China, through a Middle Niger lens. Highly-illustrated throughout, this work is a key text for all students of African archaeology and of comparative pre-industrial urbanism.

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Author information

Roderick J. McIntosh is Professor of Anthropology at Rice University and visiting Professor of Archaeology at the University of Pretoria, South Africa. His recent publications include The Peoples of Middle Niger: Island of Gold (1998), The Way the Wind Blows: Climate, History, and Human Action (2000) and Geomorphology and Human Palaeoecology of the Mema, Mali (2005).

Review quote

"...an impressive, path-breaking explanation of the origin of urban settlements on the Middle Niger River, climaxed by a fascinating final chapter in which the author offers a comparative overview of the archaeology of urban landscapes in Mesopotamia, the Nile valley, and northern China." -David C. Conrad, Emeritus, SUNY Oswego, American Historical Review

Table of contents

1. Discovery; 2. Transformed landscapes; 3. Accommodation; 4. Excavation; 5. Surveying the hinterland; 6. Comparative urban landscapes.