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    The Ancient Economy: Evidence and Models (Social Science History) (Paperback) Edited by J. G. Manning, Edited by Ian Morris

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    DescriptionHistorians and archaeologists normally assume that the economies of ancient Greece and Rome between about 1000 BC and AD 500 were distinct from those of Egypt and the Near East. However, very different kinds of evidence survive from each of these areas, and specialists have, as a result, developed very different methods of analysis for each region. This book marks the first time that historians and archaeologists of Egypt, the Near East, Greece, and Rome have come together with sociologists, political scientists, and economists, to ask whether the differences between accounts of these regions reflect real economic differences in the past, or are merely a function of variations in the surviving evidence and the intellectual traditions that have grown up around it. The contributors describe the types of evidence available and demonstrate the need for clearer thought about the relationships between evidence and models in ancient economic history, laying the foundations for a new comparative account of economic structures and growth in the ancient Mediterranean world.


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  • Full bibliographic data for The Ancient Economy

    Title
    The Ancient Economy
    Subtitle
    Evidence and Models
    Authors and contributors
    Edited by J. G. Manning, Edited by Ian Morris
    Physical properties
    Format: Paperback
    Number of pages: 304
    Width: 165 mm
    Height: 228 mm
    Thickness: 16 mm
    Weight: 404 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9780804757553
    ISBN 10: 0804757550
    Classifications

    B&T Book Type: NF
    BIC subject category V2: HBG
    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: T5.1
    BIC E4L: HIS
    BIC subject category V2: HBLA, KCZ
    Libri: I-HP
    BIC geographical qualifier V2: 1QDA
    Ingram Subject Code: HP
    Abridged Dewey: 930
    LC classification: DE
    B&T General Subject: 431
    Ingram Theme: CHRN/ANCIEN
    Warengruppen-Systematik des deutschen Buchhandels: 27830
    BISAC V2.8: BUS022000
    B&T Merchandise Category: UP
    BISAC V2.8: HIS002000
    BIC subject category V2: 1QDA
    DC21: 330.93
    DC22: 330.93
    Thema V1.0: NHB, KCZ, NHC
    Edition
    New edition
    Edition statement
    New edition
    Illustrations note
    6 tables, 24 figures
    Publisher
    Stanford University Press
    Imprint name
    Stanford University Press
    Publication date
    01 February 2007
    Publication City/Country
    Palo Alto
    Author Information
    J. G. Manning is Associate Professor of Classics at Stanford University. Ian Morris is the Jean and Rebecca Willard Professor of Classics and Professor of History at Stanford University.
    Review quote
    "This book is witness to the lively debates currently held on ancient economic history. All the authors are resolved to go beyond the orthodoxies established by Finley; they actually do incorporate questions and methods from economic history and theory of other periods without exposing themselves to the accusation of formalism or modernism... This book is an important step towards an economic history or the ancient Mediterranean." - EH.Net "We have waited too long for this fine book." - Journal of Interdisciplinary History "[This book] is an important and timely contribution to a growing field in the study of Mediterranean antiquity." - Canadian Journal of History
    Back cover copy
    "We have waited too long for this fine book."--Journal of Interdisciplinary History "[This book] is an important and timely contribution to a growing field in the study of Mediterranean antiquity."--Canadian Journal of History
    Flap copy
    Historians and archaeologists normally assume that the economies of ancient Greece and Rome between about 1000 BC and AD 500 were distinct from those of Egypt and the Near East. However, very different kinds of evidence survive from each of these areas, and specialists have, as a result, developed very different methods of analysis for each region. This book marks the first time that historians and archaeologists of Egypt, the Near East, Greece, and Rome have come together with sociologists, political scientists, and economists, to ask whether the differences between accounts of these regions reflect real economic differences in the past, or are merely a function of variations in the surviving evidence and the intellectual traditions that have grown up around it. The contributors describe the types of evidence available and demonstrate the need for clearer thought about the relationships between evidence and models in ancient economic history, laying the foundations for a new comparative account of economic structures and growth in the ancient Mediterranean world.