The American West

The American West

By (author) Dee Brown

US$16.87

Free delivery worldwide

Available
Dispatched in 2 business days

When will my order arrive?

"The American West" centers on three subjects: Native Americans, settlers, and ranchers. Dee Brown re-creates these groups struggles for their place in this new landscape and illuminates the history of the old West in a single volume, filled with maps and vintage photographs. In his spirited telling of this national saga, Brown demonstrates once again his abilities as a master storyteller and as an entertaining popular historian.

show more
  • Paperback | 461 pages
  • 167.64 x 228.6 x 30.48mm | 657.71g
  • 07 Feb 1996
  • SIMON & SCHUSTER
  • New York
  • English
  • New edition
  • New edition
  • 50 b&w photographs, 21 maps
  • 0684804417
  • 9780684804415
  • 1,192,429

Other books in this category

Other people who viewed this bought:

Review quote

Michael Kammen "Pulitzer Prize Winner, "New York Newsday" A galloping, anecdotal narrative of the trans-Mississippi West from the Civil War to the turn of the century.

show more

Review text

A pleasant but uninspired collection of vignettes about the history of the West that offers nothing new. Noted Western author Brown (When the Century Was Young; 1993, etc.) serves up a new volume detailing the life and history of the American frontier. The material is culled from the text of three previous picture books - Fighting Indians of the West, Trail Driving Days, and The Settlers' West - that he co-authored in the 1940s and 1950s with the late Martin Schmitt (editor of General George Crook: His Autobiography, 1946); this version also includes several photographs from the earlier volumes. Always sensitive to the long, losing struggle of the Indians, Brown movingly depicts Sioux chief Red Cloud's successful war to close the Bozeman Trail (including the so-called Fetterman Massacre) and Cheyenne chief Black Kettle's unsuccessful attempts to keep the peace, shattered by the Sand Creek and Washita massacres. But the white West is also covered, with glimpses of life on the great cattle drives and of the boomtowns at the end of the beef trails - towns like Abilene, Tex., and Wichita, Kans., which thrived as rail centers for the shipment of cattle. The mythmaking process that shaped the West of popular imagination is also dear to Brown's heart, and he brings into focus the impact of tall tales (Paul Bunyan, etc.), Wild West shows (Buffalo Bill, et al.), rodeos, Billy the Kid's inflated legend, and The Virginian, a novel by Harvard-educated Philadelphia lawyer Owen Wister that supplanted real-life cowboy Charlie Siringo's much more authentic A Texas CowBoy in the public imagination. Brown writes in an engaging style, but our view of frontier history has changed a lot in 40 years. Rather than this recycled material, itself seduced by the myths it seeks to expose, better to read Brown's own Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee. (Kirkus Reviews)

show more