• American Rose: A Nation Laid Bare: The Life and Times of Gypsy Rose Lee See large image

    American Rose: A Nation Laid Bare: The Life and Times of Gypsy Rose Lee (Paperback) By (author) Karen Abbott

    05

    Hard to find title available from Book Depository

    $12.75 - Save $9.77 43% off - RRP $22.52 Free delivery worldwide Available
    Dispatched in 3 business days
    When will my order arrive?
    Add to basket | Add to wishlist |

    Description"NEW YORK TIMES" BESTSELLER America was flying high in the Roaring Twenties. Then, almost overnight, the Great Depression brought it crashing down. When the dust settled, people were primed for a star who could distract them from reality. Enter Gypsy Rose Lee, a strutting, bawdy, erudite stripper who possessed a gift for delivering exactly what America needed. With her superb narrative skills and eye for detail, Karen Abbott brings to life an era of ambition, glamour, struggle, and survival. Using exclusive interviews and never-before-published material, she vividly delves into Gypsy's world, including her intense triangle relationship with her sister, actress June Havoc, and their formidable mother, Rose, a petite but ferocious woman who literally killed to get her daughters on the stage. Weaving in the compelling saga of the Minskys--four scrappy brothers from New York City who would pave the way for Gypsy Rose Lee's brand of burlesque and transform the entertainment landscape--Karen Abbott creates a rich account of a legend whose sensational tale of tragedy and triumph embodies the American Dream.


Other books

Other books in this category
Showing items 1 to 11 of 11

 

Reviews | Bibliographic data
Showing 1 to 2 of 2 results

Reviews for American Rose

Write a review
  • American Rose by Karen Abbott5

    Susan Frances Gypsy Rose Lee, who lived through the tail end of La Belle Epoque, the emergence of the Roaring '20s, the heart of the Great Depression and the Second World War, the glamorous '50s, and the sexual revolution of the '60s witnessed it all becoming an American icon by the time of her death in 1970. Author Karen Abbott chronicles the rise of burlesque artist, stage persona, and published writer Gypsy Rose Lee, born Rose Louise Hovick in Seattle, Washington, in Abbott's book American Rose: A Nation Laid Bare, The Life and Times of Gypsy Rose Lee. Abbott shares a wealth of knowledge that puts readers in the front row of a burgeoning subculture.

    Though Gypsy Rose is the main attraction of Abbott's book, the author also furnishes insight into the social and political conditions of the atmosphere that encircled Gypsy Rose as she struggled to keep her head above the water. Amidst a society in flux and a domineering mother who strived to control her two daughters, Rose Louise and June known as Dainty June on the Vaudeville circuit, Gypsy Rose Lee became proof that the rags to riches story is real.

    Abbott not only shares facts and experiences relating to her main subject Gypsy Rose Lee, but she also delves into the characters that played a peripheral role in her subject's life. She points out how many of them influenced Gypsy Rose to develop a gimmick for her act such as Vaudeville performer/ escape artist Harry Houdini who crafted illusions by coaxing audiences with his charm and persuasive speeches. Entertainer Fanny Brice who donned Victorian age garments for her stage persona, and the cheeky wit of stripteaser Georgia Sothern are tangential players in Abbott's book who each had a direct impact on Gypsy Rose Lee. While some influenced her act as a stripteaser others taught her how to be a shrewd business woman like her acquaintances with the underworld bosses such as Irving Wexler (aka Waxey Gordon) who made her a courtesan for his pals, and her mother Rose who showed her not to have remorse when she lied, stole or cheated people.

    Abbott shows how Gypsy Rose Lee grew up in an environment that instilled in her the code of the jungle. It is a dog eat dog world and she needed to do what she had to in order to survive. Conjuring up stories became a way of life for Gypsy Rose who acquired her stage name while working in Vaudeville with her sister June. Their stories were well-rehearsed and shrouded the truth. It became "a sardonic charade" as Abbott phrased it explaining how Gypsy Rose's life became the inspiration for the 1943 film "Lady of Burlesque" directed by William Wellman and starring Barbara Stanwyck in the lead role. Hence foddering the legend of Gypsy Rose Lee and perpetuating the illusion she crafted for herself.

    Abbott peels away the layers of the illusion and fables manufactured about Gypsy Rose Lee. She shows that Gypsy Rose began life as an ordinary girl and over the years honed a stage persona that made men idolize her and women envy her while secretly wishing they could be her. Gypsy Rose Lee crafted a fantasy, and though her life off stage was far from the fantasy she created on stage, it was living the fantasy on stage that was her escape from the strife of reality and provided an escape for her audiences. by Susan Frances

  • Review: American Rose by Karen Abbott5

    Susan Frances Gypsy Rose Lee, who lived through the tail end of La Belle Epoque, the
    emergence of the Roaring '20s, the heart of the Great Depression and the
    Second World War, the glamorous '50s, and the sexual revolution of the '60s witnessed it all becoming an American icon by the time of her death in 1970. Author Karen Abbott chronicles the rise of burlesque artist, stage persona, and published writer Gypsy Rose Lee, born Rose Louise Hovick in Seattle, Washington, in Abbott's book American Rose: A Nation Laid Bare, The Life and Times of Gypsy Rose Lee. Abbott shares a wealth of knowledge that puts readers in the front row of a burgeoning subculture.

    Though Gypsy Rose is the main attraction of Abbott's book, the author also
    furnishes insight into the social and political conditions of the atmosphere
    that encircled Gypsy Rose as she struggled to keep her head above the water. Amidst a society in flux and a domineering mother who strived to control her two daughters, Rose Louise and June known as Dainty June on the Vaudeville circuit, Gypsy Rose Lee became proof that the rags to riches story is real.

    Abbott not only shares facts and experiences relating to her main subject
    Gypsy Rose Lee, but she also delves into the characters that played a
    peripheral role in her subject's life. She points out how many of them
    influenced Gypsy Rose to develop a gimmick for her act such as Vaudeville
    performer/ escape artist Harry Houdini who crafted illusions by coaxing
    audiences with his charm and persuasive speeches. Entertainer Fanny Brice who donned Victorian age garments for her stage persona, and the cheeky wit of stripteaser Georgia Sothern are tangential players in Abbott's book who each had a direct impact on Gypsy Rose Lee. While some influenced her act as a stripteaser others taught her how to be a shrewd business woman like her acquaintances with the underworld bosses such as Irving Wexler (aka Waxey Gordon) who made her a courtesan for his pals, and her mother Rose who showed her not to have remorse when she lied, stole or cheated people.

    Abbott shows how Gypsy Rose Lee grew up in an environment that instilled in her the code of the jungle. It is a dog eat dog world and she needed to do what she had to in order to survive. Conjuring up stories became a way of life for Gypsy Rose who acquired her stage name while working in Vaudeville with her sister June. Their stories were well-rehearsed and shrouded the truth. It became "a sardonic charade" as Abbott phrased it explaining how Gypsy Rose's life became the inspiration for the 1943 film "Lady of Burlesque" directed by William Wellman and starring Barbara Stanwyck in the lead role. Hence foddering the legend of Gypsy Rose Lee and perpetuating the illusion she crafted for herself.

    Abbott peels away the layers of the illusion and fables manufactured about
    Gypsy Rose Lee. She shows that Gypsy Rose began life as an ordinary girl and over the years honed a stage persona that made men idolize her and women envy her while secretly wishing they could be her. Gypsy Rose Lee crafted a fantasy, and though her life off stage was far from the fantasy she created on stage, it was living the fantasy on stage that was her escape from the strife of reality and provided an escape for her audiences. by Susan Frances

Write a review
Showing 1 to 2 of 2 results