Alexander the Great in Fact and Fiction

Alexander the Great in Fact and Fiction

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This book collects together ten contributions by leading experts in the field of Alexander studies which represent the most advanced scholarship in this area. They span the gamut between historical reconstruction and historiographical research, and viewed as a whole represent a wide spectrum of methodology. This first English collection of essays on Alexander includes a comparison of the Spanish conquest of Mexico with the Macedonians in the east which examines the attitudes towards the subject peoples and the justification of conquest, an analysis of the attested conspiracies at the Macedonian and Persian courts, and studies of panhellenic ideology and the concept of kingship. There is a radical new interpretation of the hunting fresco from Tomb II at Vergina, a new date for the pamphlet on Alexander's last days which ends the Alexander romance, and a re-interpretation of the bizarre portents of his death. Three chapters on historiography address the problem of interpreting Alexander's attested behaviour, the indirect source tradition used by Polybius, and the resonances of contemporary politics in the extant histories.

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  • Paperback | 384 pages
  • 134 x 214 x 24mm | 480.82g
  • Oxford University Press
  • OxfordUnited Kingdom
  • English
  • Revised ed.
  • 1 line drawing, 17 half-tones
  • 0199252750
  • 9780199252756
  • 774,545

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Author Information

E.J. Baynham is Senior Lecturer, University of Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia

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Review quote

A full bibliography and a useful index complete this valuable contribution to Alexander scholarship. In sum, the specialist and the student alike are served equally well ... highly recommended. Bryn Mawr Classical Review For those whose interest in Alexander has been stirred, as well as for students of the period, this collection must become compulsory reading. Contemporary Review

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