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    The Affect Theory Reader (Paperback) Edited by Melissa Gregg, Edited by Gregory J. Seigworth

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    DescriptionThis field-defining collection consolidates and builds momentum in the burgeoning area of affect studies. Major thinkers theorize affect: visceral forces beneath, alongside, or generally other than conscious knowing that can serve to drive us toward movement, thought and ever-changing forms of relation. As Lauren Berlant explores "cruel optimism," Brian Massumi theorizes the affective logic of public threat, and Elspeth Probyn examines shame, they, along with the other contributors, show how an awareness of affect is opening up exciting new insights in disciplines from anthropology, cultural studies, geography, and psychology to philosophy, queer studies, and sociology. In essays diverse in subject matter, style and perspective, the contributors demonstrate how affect theory illuminates the intertwined realms of the aesthetic, the ethical and the political as they play out across bodies (human and non-human) in both mundane and extraordinary ways. They reveal the broad theoretical possibilities opened by an awareness of affect as they reflect on topics including ethics, food, public morale, glamour, snark in the workplace and mental health regimes. The Affect Theory Reader includes an interview with the cultural theorist Lawrence Grossberg and an afterword by the anthropologist Kathleen Stewart. In the introduction, the editors suggest ways of defining affect, trace the concept's history and highlight the role of affect theory in various areas of study. Contributors; Sara Ahmed; Ben Anderson; Lauren Berlant; Lone Bertelsen; Steven D. Brown; Patricia Ticineto Clough; Anna Gibbs; Melissa Gregg; Lawrence Grossberg; Ben Highmore; Brian Massumi; Andrew Murphie; Elspeth Probyn; Gregory J. Seigworth; Kathleen Stewart; Nigel Thrift; Ian Tucker; Megan Watkins


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    Title
    The Affect Theory Reader
    Authors and contributors
    Edited by Melissa Gregg, Edited by Gregory J. Seigworth
    Physical properties
    Format: Paperback
    Number of pages: 416
    Width: 152 mm
    Height: 231 mm
    Thickness: 25 mm
    Weight: 544 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9780822347767
    ISBN 10: 0822347768
    Classifications

    Warengruppen-Systematik des deutschen Buchhandels: 25710
    BIC E4L: PSY
    B&T Book Type: NF
    BIC subject category V2: JFC
    B&T Modifier: Region of Publication: 01
    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: S2.3
    Ingram Subject Code: LC
    Libri: I-LC
    DC22: 152.4
    B&T Modifier: Text Format: 02
    BIC subject category V2: JMQ
    B&T Modifier: Academic Level: 02
    B&T General Subject: 495
    BISAC V2.8: SOC026000
    LC subject heading:
    BISAC V2.8: SOC010000
    B&T Merchandise Category: UP
    LC subject heading:
    BISAC V2.8: LIT006000
    LC classification: BF175.5.A35 A344 2010
    Publisher
    Duke University Press
    Imprint name
    Duke University Press
    Publication date
    25 November 2010
    Publication City/Country
    North Carolina
    Author Information
    Melissa Gregg works in the Department of Gender and Cultural Studies at the University of Sydney in Australia. She is the author of "Cultural Studies' Affective Voices."Gregory J. Seigworth is a professor in communication and theater at Millersville University in Pennsylvania.
    Review quote
    "While a reader of the book might be left less rather than more sure of what precisely constitutes 'affect theory', or even affect itself, s/he is nevertheless very likely to be moved by the range of both thought and affective styles that make up the volume and constitute what the editors call in the introduction, an 'inventory of shimmers' (p11). This incitement to 'more than discourse', the capacity 'to touch, to move, to mobilise readers' (p24) is exactly what one would hope for from a reader of affect theory, and is what the contributions that make up this collection indeed achieve." Michael Goddard, New Formations "The Affect Theory Reader shows how affect can be deployed in a range of frameworks, including the neurological, psychological, social, cultural, philosophical and political, and that there is room for debate among these various fields - above all between the Deleuze-inspired writings of Brian Massumi and his followers and those of the more scientifically minded followers of Eve Sedgwick, whose work was formulated in dialogue with affect psychologist Silvan Tomkins" Todd Cronan, Radical Philosophy, March 2012 "The Affect Theory Reader is unique. It gathers interesting and provocative articles on affect by well-known theorists and suggestively brings to expression the productive divergence between different philosophical and psychological positions on the subject." Erin Manning, author of Politics of Touch: Sense, Movement, Sovereignty "Written by some of the most interesting and important thinkers in the field, the essays in this superb collection prove how any serious consideration of culture and politics needs to involve serious attention to affect. The Affect Theory Reader covers remarkable ground: from the ontology of 'future threat' in Bush's pre-emptive politics to the management of workplace affects in the information economy; from the biology of human mimicry to attachments to promises of the 'good life' that often cruelly wear out economically precarious subjects. Thoughtfully curated and genuinely interdisciplinary with contributors from fields ranging from media studies to geography, Melissa Gregg and Gregory J. Seigworth's reader will be indispensable to anyone working in or adjacent to affect theory." Sianne Ngai, author of Ugly Feelings
    Table of contents
    Acknowledgments An Inventory of Shimmers / Gregory J. Seigworth and Melissa Gregg Part I. Impingements 1. Happy Objects / Sara Ahmed; 2. The Future Birth of the Affective Fact: The Political Ontology of Threat / Brian Massumi; 3. Writing Shame / Elspeth Probyn Part II. Aesthetics and the Everyday 4. Cruel Optimism / Lauren Berlant; 5. Bitter after Taste: Affect, Food, and Social Aesthetics / Ben Highmore; 6. An Ethics of Everyday Infinities and Powers: Felix Guattari on Affect and the Refrain / Lone Bertlesen and Andrew Murphie Part III. Incorporeal/Inorganic 7. Modulating the Excess of Affect: Morale in a State of "Total War" / Ben Anderson; 8. After Affect: Sympathy, Synchrony, and Mimetic Communication / Anna Gibbs; 9. The Affective Turn: Political Economy, Biomedia, and Bodies / Patricia T. Clough Part IV. Managing Affects 10. Eff the Ineffable: Affect, Somatic Management, and Mental Health Service Users / Steven D. Brown and Ian Tucker; 11. On Friday Night Drinks: Workplace Affects in the Age of the Cubicle / Melissa Gregg; 12. Desiring Recognition, Accumulating Affect / Megan Watkins Part V. After Affect 13. Understanding the Material Practices of Glamour / Nigel Thrift; 14. Affect's Future: Rediscovering the Virtual in the Actual / Lawrence Grossberg (An Interview with Gregory J. Seigworth and Melissa Gregg) Afterword. Worlding Refrains / Kathleen Stewart References; Contributors; Index