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    Aeneid (Hardback) By (author) Virgil, Translated by Stanley Lombardo

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    DescriptionLong a master of the crafts of Homeric translation and of rhapsodic performance, Stanley Lombardo now turns to the quintessential epic of Roman antiquity, a work with deep roots in the Homeric tradition. With characteristic virtuosity, he delivers a rendering of the Aeneid as compelling as his groundbreaking translations of the Iliad and the Odyssey , yet one that--like the Aeneid itself--conveys a unique epic sensibility and a haunting artistry all its own. W. R. Johnson's Introduction makes an ideal companion to the translation, offering brilliant insight into the legend of Aeneas; the contrasting roles of the gods, fate, and fortune in Homeric versus Virgilian epic; the character of Aeneas as both wanderer and warrior; Aeneas' relationship to both his enemy Turnus and his lover Dido; the theme of doomed youths in the epic; and Virgil's relationship to the brutal history of Rome that he memorializes in his poem. A map, a Glossary of Names, a Translator's Preface, and Suggestions for Further Reading are also included.


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  • Full bibliographic data for Aeneid

    Title
    Aeneid
    Authors and contributors
    By (author) Virgil, Translated by Stanley Lombardo
    Physical properties
    Format: Hardback
    Number of pages: 432
    Width: 139 mm
    Height: 215 mm
    Thickness: 36 mm
    Weight: 18 g
    Language
    English
    ISBN
    ISBN 13: 9780872207325
    ISBN 10: 0872207323
    Classifications

    B&T Book Type: NF
    Nielsen BookScan Product Class 3: T3.1
    BIC E4L: LIT
    BIC subject category V2: DCF
    B&T Merchandise Category: TXT
    BISAC V2.8: FIC004000
    B&T General Subject: 431
    BISAC V2.8: HIS002020
    DC22: 873/.01
    LC subject heading: , ,
    DC22: 873.01
    BISAC V2.8: POE008000, POE014000
    LC classification: PA6807.A5 L58 2005
    BIC subject category V2: DB
    Thema V1.0: DB, DCF
    Illustrations note
    maps
    Publisher
    Hackett Publishing Co, Inc
    Imprint name
    Hackett Publishing Co, Inc
    Publication date
    31 March 2005
    Publication City/Country
    Cambridge, MA
    Author Information
    Stanley Lombardo is Professor of Classics, University of Kansas. W. R. Johnson is Professor of Classics and Comparative Literature, Emeritus, University of Chicago.
    Review quote
    Adapting words of the ancient critic Longinus, [Lombardo] refers to the intense light of noon of the Iliad , the magical glow of the setting sun in the Odyssey , and the chiaroscuro of the Aeneid , a darkness visible. This latter phrase is the title of a famous interpretation of the Aeneid by W. R. Johnson, who contributes a splendid essay to the translation. Whether recited or read, the present volume stands as another fine performance on Lombardo's part. Summing up: Highly recommended. --C. Fantazzi, CHOICE Lombardo ... tends to let Virgil be Virgil, and so avoids imposing unwarranted interpretation on the unwary reader... [W.R. Johnson's] introduction is masterful and illuminating. --Hayden Pelliccia, The New York Review of Books Crisp, idiomatic, and precise, this is a translation for our era. The list of further reading, grounded in the writings of W.R. Johnson (who also wrote the Introduction) and Michael C. J. Putnam, suggests the context that informs the translation: here, as the translator says in the Preface, you will find an Aeneid that works more in the shadows than in the light... This translation would be excellent for classroom use: not only would it incite fascinating discussions about issues of war and empire, but it also reads well aloud... Together with Johnson's Introduction, this volume offers the Aeneid in terms that will resonate strongly with the general reader of today. --Sarah Spence, New England Classical Journal