The 48 Laws of Power
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The 48 Laws of Power

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Before "Mastery, "came "The 48 Laws of Power" the "New York Times" bestseller that started it all Amoral, cunning, ruthless, and instructive, "The 48 Laws of Power "is the definitive manual for anyone interested in gaining, observing, or defending against ultimate control. In the book that "People "magazine proclaimed beguiling and fascinating, Robert Greene and Joost Elffers have distilled three thousand years of the history of power into 48 essential laws by drawing from the philosophies of Machiavelli, Sun Tzu, and Carl Von Clausewitz and also from the lives of figures ranging from Henry Kissinger to P.T. Barnum. Some laws teach the need for prudence ( Law 1: Never Outshine the Master ), others teach the value of confidence ( Law 28: Enter Action with Boldness ), and many recommend absolute self-preservation ( Law 15: Crush Your Enemy Totally ). Every law, though, has one thing in common: an interest in total domination. In a bold and arresting two-color package, "The 48 Laws of Power "is ideal whether your aim is conquest, self-defense, or simply to understand the rules of the game."show more

Product details

  • Paperback | 480 pages
  • 165.1 x 246.38 x 30.48mm | 725.74g
  • Penguin Putnam Inc
  • New York, NY, United States
  • English
  • 0140280197
  • 9780140280197
  • 4,324

Back cover copy

THE BESTSELLING BOOK FOR THOSE WHO WANT POWER, WATCH POWER, OR WANT TO ARM THEMSELVES AGAINST POWER . . .A moral, cunning, ruthless, and instructive, this piercing work distills three thousand years of the history of power into forty-eight well-explicated laws. As attention-grabbing in its design as it is in its content, this bold volume outlines the laws of power in their unvarnished essence, synthesizing the philosophies of Machiavelli, Sun-tzu, Carl von Clausewitz, and other great thinkers. Some laws require prudence ("Law 1: Never Outshine the Master"), some stealth ("Law 3: Conceal Your Intentions"), and some the total absence of mercy ("Law 15: Crush Your Enemy Totally") but like it or not, all have applications in real-life situations. Illustrated through the tactics of Queen Elizabeth I, Henry Kissinger, P. T. Barnum, and other famous figures who have wielded -- or been victimized by -- power, these laws will fascinate any reader interested in gaining, observing, or defending against ultimate control.show more

Review quote

Praise for "The 48 Laws of Power" It s the rules for suits . . . Machiavelli has a new rival. And Sun Tzu had better watch his back. Greene . . . has put together a checklist of ambitious behavior. Just reading the table of contents is enough to stir a little corner-office lust. "New York" magazine Beguiling . . . literate . . . fascinating. A wry primer for people who desperately want to be on top. "People "magazine An heir to Machiavelli s "Prince" . . . gentler souls will find this book frightening, those whose moral compass is oriented solely to power will have a perfect "vade mecum. " "Publishers Weekly" Satisfyingly dense and . . . literary, with fantastic examples of genius power-game players. It s "The Rules "meets "In Pursuit of Wow! "with a degree in comparative literature. "Allure""show more

About Joost Elffers

Robert Greene has a degree in classical studies and is the author of several bestselling books, including "The 48 Laws of Power, The 33 Strategies of War," "The Art of Seduction," and "Mastery." He lives in Los Angeles. Joost Elffers is the packaging genius behind Viking Studio's Secret Language series, "Play with Your Food," and "How Are You Peeling?." He lives in New York City.show more

Table of contents

Preface Law 1: Never outshine the master Always make those above you feel comfortably superior. In your desire to please or impress them, do not go too far in displaying your talents or you might accomplish the opposite-inspire fear and insecurity. Make your masters appear more brilliant than they are and you will attain the heights of power. Law 2: Never put too much trust in friends, learn how to use enemies Be wary of friends-they will betray you more quickly, for they are easily aroused to envy. They also become spoiled and tyrranical. But hire a former enemy and he will be more loyal than a friend, because he has more to prove. In fact, you have more to fear from friends than from enemies. If you have no enemies, find a way to make them. Law 3: Conceal your intentions Keep people off-balance and in the dark by never revealing the purpose behind your actions. If they have no clue what you are up to, they cannot prepare a defense. Guide them far enough down the wrong path, envelop them in enough smoke, and by the time they realize your intentions, it will be too late. Law 4: Always say less than necessary When you are trying to impress people with words, the more you say, the more common you appear, and the less in control. Even if you are saying something banal, it will seem original if you make it vague, open-ended, and sphinxlike. Powerful people impress and intimidate by saying less. The more you say, the more likely you are to say something foolish. Law 5: So much depends on reputation-guard it with your life Reputation is the cornerstone of power. Through reputation alone you can intimidate and win; once it slips, however, you are vulnerable, and will be attacked on all sides. Make your reputation unassailable. Always be alert to potential attacks and thwart them before they happen. Meanwhile, learn to destroy your enemies by opening holes in their own reputations. Then stand aside and let public opinion hang them. Law 6: Court attention at all cost Everything is judged by its appearance; what is unseen counts for nothing. Never let yourself get lost in the crowd, then, or buried in oblivion. Stand out. Be conspicuous, at all cost. Make yourself a magnet of attention by appearing larger, more colorful, more mysterious than the bland and timid masses. Law 7: Get others to do the work for you, but always take the credit Use the wisdom, knowledge, and legwork of other people to further your own cause. Not only will such assistance save you valuable time and energy, it will give you a godlike aura of efficiency and speed. In the end your helpers will be forgotten and you will be remembered. Never do yourself what others can do for you. Law 8: Make other people come to you-use bait if necessary When you force the other person to act, you are the one in control. It is always better to make your opponent come to you, abandoning his own plans in the process. Lure him with fabulous gains-then attack. You hold the cards. Law 9: Win through your actions, never through an argument Any momentary triumph you think you have gained through argument is really a Pyrrhic victory: The resentment and ill will you stire up is stronger and lasts longer than any momentary change of opinion. It is much more powerful to get others to agree with you through your actions, without saying a word. Demonstrate, do not explicate. Law 10: Infection: Avoid the unhappy and unlucky You can die from someone else's misery-emotional states are as infectious as diseases. You may feel you are helping the drowning man but you are only precipitating your own disaster. The unfortunate sometimes draw misfortune on themselves; they will also draw it on you. Associate with the happy and fortunate instead. Law 11: Learn to keep people dependent on you To maintain your independence you must always be needed and wanted. The more you are relied on, the more freedom you have. Make people depend on you for their happiness and pshow more

Review Text

"Machiavelli has a new rival. And Sun Tzu had better watch his back. Greene . . . has put together a checklist of ambitious behavior. Just reading the table of contents is enough to stir a little corner-office lust." - New York magazine "Beguiling . . . literate . . . fascinating. A wry primer for people who desperately want to be on top." - People magazine "An heir to Machiavelli's Prince . . . gentler souls will find this book frightening, those whose moral compass is oriented solely to power will have a perfect vade mecum." - Publishers Weekly "Satisfyingly dense and . . . literary, with fantastic examples of genius power-game players. It's The Rules meets In Pursuit of Wow! with a degree in comparative literature."- Allureshow more

Customer reviews

Do not waste your time, you may not find this opportunity again, this is an amazing book, with the paperback and so on..show more
by rashid qazizada