• The 4-Hour Chef: The Simple Path to Cooking Like a Pro, Learning Anything, and Living the Good Life See large image

    The 4-Hour Chef: The Simple Path to Cooking Like a Pro, Learning Anything, and Living the Good Life (Hardback) By (author) Timothy Ferriss

    01

    Free delivery worldwide

    $39.59 - Save $4.38 (9%) - RRP $43.97 Free delivery worldwide (to United States and
    all these other countries)
    Usually dispatched within 48 hours
    Add to basket | Add to wishlist |

    Short Description for The 4-Hour Chef Building upon Timothy Ferriss's internationally successful "4-hour" franchise, "The 4-Hour Chef" transforms the way we cook, eat, and learn. Featuring recipes and cooking tricks from world-renowned chefs, and interspersed with the radically counterintuitive advice Ferriss's fans have come to expect, "The 4-Hour Chef" is a practical but unusual guide to mastering food and cooking, whether you are a seasoned pro or a blank-slate novice. 
    Full description


Other books

Other books in this category
Showing items 1 to 10 of 10
Showing 1 to 1 of 1 results

Reviews for The 4-Hour Chef

Write a review
  • Superficial1

    Valentin Simeonov The start of the book was promising. I have always been interested in fast learning, so I thought it might be worthy. Well it is not. Let me explain.
    1. He says he learned N languages, but never defined what is a learned language. For me it is at least B2 level (I've learned 4 foreign languages myself). However, from the writings of Mr. Ferris I understand that his targets are significantly lower. Something like to tell that you have learned Taekwon Do and it fact you have obtained an yellow belt. Yes, you will be hundred times better than the average human, who never entered in a dojang. Having in mind that Taekwon Do penetratation is less than 5% (probably less than 1%) with 3 months of training you are in the top 5% in the World. Great, but at the bottom 1% of those who actually practice. This is far from learned and extremely far from mastered.

    2. Another thing is the time needed for learning. When he says he needed 3 months to learn German it is a non-sens beacause it doesn't tell (1) The level (certified?) and (2) The time spent. Three months of full time learning is one thing and 3 months of getting up at 5 o'clock in the morning to have 2 hours before your kids wake up is another thing.

    3. Promote fast learning with a book of 600+ pages, come oooon ... and there is even more - it is for cooking, that millions of people simply do every day. And I ensure you that my wife thinks life is beautiful every time I cook. There is one thing missed. The reason why there are more kebaps and fast-food instead of fine gourmet restaurant is not the skills of the chef. It is the fact that people do need more sandwiches than black caviar.

    However, I agree for few points:

    1. Learning the basics of anything you do makes the fun better. Even you have no intention to play frequently bowling, learning the basics is fun and gives you more fun for the occasional games with co-workers or dates. For example, I practice learning the basics of a foreign language whenever I travel to a country, where people speak a language that I don't know. But with basics I mean basics (similar to the 12 sentence practice of Mr. Ferris), and not boasting after that I have learned that language.

    2. I agree that when you practice something you should not always listen to those with more experience than you. You should try other approaches. But this doesn't guarantee success (as could be assumed from this book). One time it will be a failure, another could be a success. But you don't need to buy the overpriced book of Mr. Ferris to learn this. It is enough to google "Siddharta Buddha".

    In a conclusion, a book that tells you how to be average to good in anything (a little more on cooking). But beeing good in many areas is quite easy. To be the best in one is difficult. The length of the book contradicts the idea. With that idea I would say 150 pages is the very maximum. by Valentin Simeonov

Write a review
Showing 1 to 1 of 1 results