2052: A Global Forecast for the Next Forty Years

2052: A Global Forecast for the Next Forty Years

Paperback

By (author) Jorgen Randers

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  • Publisher: Chelsea Green Publishing Co
  • Format: Paperback | 416 pages
  • Dimensions: 152mm x 226mm x 28mm | 640g
  • Publication date: 10 July 2012
  • Publication City/Country: White River Junction
  • ISBN 10: 1603584218
  • ISBN 13: 9781603584210
  • Edition statement: New.
  • Illustrations note: Black and White Illustrations
  • Sales rank: 47,687

Product description

Forty years ago, The Limits to Growth study addressed the grand question of how humans would adapt to the physical limitations of planet Earth. It predicted that during the first half of the 21st century the ongoing growth in the human ecological footprint would stop-either through catastrophic "overshoot and collapse"-or through well-managed "peak and decline." So, where are we now? And what does our future look like? In the book 2052, Jorgen Randers, one of the coauthors of Limits to Growth, issues a progress report and makes a forecast for the next forty years. To do this, he asked dozens of experts to weigh in with their best predictions on how our economies, energy supplies, natural resources, climate, food, fisheries, militaries, political divisions, cities, psyches, and more will take shape in the coming decades. He then synthesized those scenarios into a global forecast of life as we will most likely know it in the years ahead. The good news: we will see impressive advances in resource efficiency, and an increasing focus on human well-being rather than on per capita income growth. But this change might not come as we expect. Future growth in population and GDP, for instance, will be constrained in surprising ways-by rapid fertility decline as result of increased urbanization, productivity decline as a result of social unrest, and continuing poverty among the poorest 2 billion world citizens. Runaway global warming, too, is likely. So, how do we prepare for the years ahead? With heart, fact, and wisdom, Randers guides us along a realistic path into the future and discusses what readers can do to ensure a better life for themselves and their children during the increasing turmoil of the next forty years."

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Author information

Jorgen Randers is professor of climate strategy at the BI Norwegian Business School, where he works on climate issues and scenario analysis. He was previously president of BI and deputy directory general of WWF International in Switzerland. He lectures internationally on sustainable development and especially climate, and is a non-executive member of several corporate boards.

Review quote

Publishers Weekly-Randers has made it his life's work to caution the world about the dangers of unfettered expansion, and to seek out solutions to current and prospective problems. Beginning with The Limits to Growth in 1972, he has explored possible scenarios for our social, economic, and environmental future. In this global study, Randers presents a forecast for the next 40 years, supported by statistical data, anecdotal stories, impressions from traveling the world formal analyses of particular developments, and short essays by a variety of experts. While he discusses his own opinions such as his belief that the world economy must shift its focus from fossil-fuelled economic growth to sustainable well-being the enormous amount of information and speculation here function additionally as an excellent springboard for a timely discourse. And open and informed conversation seems crucial to Randers's project indeed, he posits that unchecked climate change is not a technological problem, but a political one. Randers and his colleagues present a portrait of the future that is radically different from today, but not entirely bleak: while he believes that the worst of his predictions are possible, he humbly asks his readers to help make my forecast wrong. "